What can Cath Kidston Teach Fundraisers?

Like most people, I’m not a fan of junk mail – whether it’s a takeaway menu on a Monday night when I’m trying to be healthy, or a gas company looking to sell me their wares, it usually goes straight into the recycling.  With one important exception.

I always look forward to receiving mail from Cath Kidston; it’s elegant, it’s classy, and most importantly, it adds value and feels personal to me.

Suffice to say, when I recently received the company’s campaign mailing, I was thrilled. Had it not been for the typed address, I would honestly have thought it was from a particularly attentive friend.

Inside a spotted and colourful envelope awaited a really well made Christmas card and preview of their spring collection. The card thanked me for being a loyal customer, the reward for which was a 20% discount inside a pullable paper cracker.

I loved the exclusivity of this card, which felt like it was from an old friend, rather than a multi-million pound business, as well as the interactive cracker, inside which lay a lucrative discount just for me.

So, what do I think fundraisers could take away from this?

• Ensure your supporters feel appreciated. Charities can’t give people money off their favourite brand; instead, they can add value by demonstrating the difference that their donation has and, and will continue to, make.

• Personalise your mail – even better, handwrite it if resources allow. Edinburgh based charity Bethany Christian Trust, for example, handwrite every single Christmas card they send out to their supporters.

• If you’re able to, include something interactive in your mailings. Be creative about this – it doesn’t have to break the bank; but it should be something memorable that recipients can associate with your organisation.

This blog was originally featured on Fundraising UK, on the 14th of December 2015.

 

2 thoughts on “What can Cath Kidston Teach Fundraisers?

  1. I like your web site. I did google ‘Rebecca Curtis’ and it came up with a horse trainer!

    I agree, you have got to make people feel valued and engage with them, go the extra mile and hopefully they will return and give their support.

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